In the history of the written word, the illuminated book served a specific purpose in educating the unread masses using color, symbolism and pictorial representations to convey the message written in the text. Books in this style are highly prized for their beauty, complexity, layered meaning and craftmanship.

For our 16th challenge, we asked participants to examine, in the tradition of Illuminated Letters, an area of their life or an idea they wanted to explore in a original quilt measuring 18" wide by 36" tall. Each artist chose a letter and used it in their pieces. In honor of SAT's origins, we asked artists to identify an area or technique of fiber arts unfamiliar to them and to stretch their artistic or technical ability by incorporating that area or technique in their pieces.   Several artists completed two pieces, allowing us to have the complete alphabet as part of our exhibit.

For Stretching Art and Tradition 15, we challenged participants to create a quilt, garment or doll interpreting the theme "Hi, It’s Me!". Are you a better you than you imagined? Secretly dreaming of being a super hero or a super baker? Are you an open book or are there unplumbed depths. This challenge is all about telling the world who you are or would be if only you had the chance and a winning lottery ticket! We would like to encourage you to consider our original challenge intention, which was and still is the growth of the individual artists, through stretching yourselves by attempting a new form, technique, or material.

To view works in this exhibit, click on the links below.

For Stretching Art and Tradition 14, artists were challenged to create a quilt, garment or doll interpreting the theme "Foundations of __________________".  With the exception of foundation garments, possibilities include: Foundations of Quilting, Foundations of Faith, Architecture, or a good breakfast. We would like to encourage you to consider our original challenge intention, which was and still is the growth of the individual artists, through stretching yourselves by attempting a new form, technique, or material.

To view works in the exhibit, click on the links below. 

Reach back into yesteryear - before TV, the internet, or pacman - and remember the games children played (and in large parts of the world, still do) dependent only on their imagination. Remember playing Duck, Duck, Goose and Red Rover? Those are just a couple of examples of games children played.  The participating artists in SAT13 were challenged to interpret the theme in a quilt, garment or doll.

To view works in the exhibit, click on the links below.

From Ethel and Lucy to salt and pepper and miles upon miles of bad puns, mediocre comedy, and extreme absurdity in between, we have lots of famous pairs in our everyday lexicon. The participating artists in SAT12 were challenged to choose a famous pair and intepret it in a doll, garment or quilt.

To view works in the exhibit, click on the links below.